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connected

Every house is like a tree rooted in a global network of underground network of pipes and cables. All we communicate through those roots is converted into a language that is the same all over the world: ASCII (American Standard Code for Information Interchange). This computer language was the first form of communication between man and computer. These curtains by Nienke Sybrandy visualize a tree that has its roots in the same ground as the house, and can be taken anywhere you go. No more longing to that old view when you move house and you sadly have to leave behind that growing tree in front of your window.

transfer

White crisp silhouette of weeds make intruiging patterns at the ‘Blueware Tiles’. The dried and pressed weeds are composed between plates of glass. The plates and tiles are then exposed under ultra violet light, which develops a photogram of the weeds in an intense Prussian blue. Great project by Glithero; two dutch designers working from London.

a dialogue

Why design’ is a video series by Herman Miller design that shows the world through the eyes of their designers and shares why they value their point of view.

“At Herman Miller design is the language we use to ask questions and seek answers to the problems our customers face. The design process is a journey into the unknown—or as George Nelson once quipped, “I have never met a designer who was retained to keep things the same as they were.” Before we decide what we do and how we do it, we like to begin by asking the question “Why?”

The point of view shown in the video about Yves Béhar is so totally up my alley, a great talk about the importance of having different kind of views.

back to basics

A little fun project on show today. I’ve gladly participated in a print-workshop ‘so you think you can print’ initiated by nieuweklasse*. It was a bit of trip down memorylane but it sure was a nice interruption of all the web-oriëntated work of today’s life. It’s always kind of great to work with the real colourstuff. And last but not least it was an excellent opportunity to give ‘life’ to my first hero.

little things

[translation]
Beautiful, old, wooden grandstands
are entered through a little narrow staircase.
The trees rage right beside you.
You look upward. If they are smart
they choose downwind, after the toss.

by Nico Dijkshoorn from ‘Kleine Dingen’ (Little Things)

straying

‘Neither Here Nor There’, is another intruiging title behind yet again another striking product. This monograph by Oliver Jeffers shows his impressive fine art which is a different side to his well-known charming children’s illustrations and the best children’s picturebooks around.

‘Neither Here Nor There’ shows his interests and concerns in a direct way. As stated over at It’s Nice That; ”I’m intrigued by the world around me and feel compelled to both capture it and ask questions of it through my work. Sometimes this is in the form of questions, sometimes in the form of stories. Sometimes my picture books are stories, and my paintings are questions. Sometimes it’s the other way around.”

Want to know more; read the whole interview here and watch his fun author film over here. Whoo – do I admire this guy, and isn’t this book wishlisted (published by the Gestalten)

Images by Oliver Jeffers

reverse

As I’m always into the story behind a striking product, this one sure fits right in. And this intruinging title ‘absence of presence’ really helps. Various printing techniques in a white colour were printed onto the first silkscreened layer in black, and leading to a striking result of 17 different layers with different structures and surfaces. The starting point of this project was to reverse the printing process and examine the effect on the different techniques. The black basic images refer to the title; they are the line when something absent or present is approached.

Design and images of ‘Absence of Presence’ are by Raw Color.

letting go

The ‘goedzak’ is an eye-catching, transparent zip lock waste bag for items that are still useable. The bag goes on the street and can be retrieved, so usable items are given a chance to a second life. The ‘goedzak’ is a straightforward introduction to sustainability. The bag is designed by Waarmakers, an agency creating designs that bring about a positive social impact, designs that materialise an ideology and trigger specific human behaviour. ‘We like stuff, but we like people better.’

The word goedzak means ‘softhearted person’, and combines the Dutch words for “good” and “bag”. Just my alley this simple, sustainable design with that sweet touch in the products name.

via Dezeen

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